North Dakota Over The Road Jobs

When people think of trucking states, North Dakota often comes to mind. This state is sparsely populated and relies heavily on manufacturing, both of which contribute to a booming trucking industry! As a North Dakota OTR driver, you may drive to remote parts of the state or to other states like South Dakota and Minnesota. The Bismarck Tribune notes that the trucking industry in North Dakota is booming, due to the amount of growing and drilling in the state. If you want to benefit from trucking growth in this state, learn more about becoming an OTR driver.

Earning a commercial driver's license may give you the chance to work for many different trucking companies. Important trucking employers in North Dakota include TMC Transportation, Pilot Logistics Services, Viessman Trucking, and Shaw Industries.

The job outlook is relatively positive in North Dakota! During each year between 2012 and 2022, O*Net expects almost 300 new tractor-trailer driving jobs. Salaries in this state tend to be higher than the national average. Per O*Net, the average salary for a tractor-trailer driver is $45,400 per year, almost $7,000 higher than the national average. The reported salary range goes up to $65,500 per year (O*Net, 2013).

Featured North Dakota Trucking Jobs
Sign-on Bonus, Top Pay, Orientation & Training Pay, Driver & Family Focused, Late Model, CSA Friendly Equipment, 401K & Full Health Coverage, Tarp/OD/Hazmat Additional Pay

Before you can jump into a big rig and start driving all over the country, you must complete your training and get your CDL! Many employers require OTR drivers to have Class A licenses, since OTR routes may include multiple trailers and heavier loads. Depending on your employer's needs, you may also wish to complete an endorsement. Endorsements offered by the North Dakota Department of Transportation include Hazmat, liquid or gas loads, passenger, school bus, and multiple trailer.

By attending a trucking school in North Dakota, you can learn about driving laws and safe driving habits. The classroom portion of your training may focus on laws, truck parts, documentation, and proper procedures. During the behind-the-wheel part of your training, you may focus on skills that you'll use every day in your career. With the help of an instructor, you can practice turning on and off a vehicle, inspecting a truck, backing up, driving around obstacles, and parking.

Once you have completed your training, the Department of Transportation can help you get your license. You have to pass at least two exams: a written knowledge exam and a physical skills exam. If you're applying for endorsements, there may be additional tests. Get passing scores and you can receive your CDL!